Tag: photos

In Photos: Arizona’s First Drive-Thru Dispensary Is an Old Bank

Arizona saw the launch of its first drive-thru cannabis dispensary over the weekend, with Sun City-based All Greens beginning to serve patients through the window of a former bank building.

The two-story, 6,500-square-foot shop, which opened Oct. 27, is among the largest medical marijuana dispensaries in the nation, according to CEO Anthony Harrington. “The facility was previously a bank with a massive vault, which we utilize for our inventory safe,” he told Leafly, “but most importantly we are now able to operate the drive-thru.”

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Getting regulators to OK a drive-thru was no easy task, Harrington added. It took six months of legal battles with the state, “but we were finally able to prove to the state that we can provide a safe and compliant process for our drive-thru and the community.”

Photographer Caitlin O’Hara took a trip to All Greens to see the drive-thru in action.

Mary Jo Chace, receptionist and bud tender, helps a customer on Oct. 30, 2017 at All Greens medical marijuana dispensary in Sun City, Ariz.
The first drive-through dispensary in Arizona on Oct. 30, 2017 at All Greens medical marijuana dispensary in Sun City, Ariz.

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Patients browse on Oct. 30, 2017 at All Greens medical marijuana dispensary in Sun City, Ariz. There is a wide age range of clientelle, given the dispensary’s close proximity to retirement communities and to Phoenix.
Andi Gonzalez, patient counselor and bud tender, prepares pre-rolled joints for a weekly promotion on Oct. 30, 2017 at All Greens medical marijuana dispensary in Sun City, Ariz.

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Patients browse on Oct. 30, 2017 at All Greens medical marijuana dispensary in Sun City, Ariz. There is a wide age range of clientelle, given the dispensary’s close proximity to retirement communities and to Phoenix.
A patient orders at the first drive-through dispensary in Arizona on Oct. 30, 2017 at All Greens medical marijuana dispensary in Sun City, Ariz.

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CEO Anthony Harrington, shows a photographer the converted bank vault turned inventory vault on Oct. 30, 2017 at All Greens medical marijuana dispensary in Sun City, Ariz. At the end of the night, the crew rolls display cases on wheels into the secure vault.
The converted bank vault turned inventory vault on Oct. 30, 2017 at All Greens medical marijuana dispensary in Sun City, Ariz. At the end of the night, the crew rolls display cases on wheels into the secure vault.

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CEO Anthony Harrington helps a patient on Oct. 30, 2017 at All Greens medical marijuana dispensary in Sun City, Ariz.

In Photos: Take a Trip Inside a Modern Hydroponics Facility

Indoor cannabis cultivation has moved out of the dimly-lit basements and garages operated by renegade activists, patients, and green thumbs. Nowadays, massive legal grows occupy sprawling warehouses and multi-million dollar agricultural facilities. As budgets and plant counts scale up, so do the technology and sophistication of these gardens.

To share a view of what the modern hydroponics facility looks like, Leafly visited Caliva, a premier cannabis dispensary and cultivation center in San Jose, California.

Spark Up and Check Out These 15 Mind-Blowing Space Images From NASA’s Photo Library

NASA recently made its image and video library open to the public for royalty-free use, so I dove through the pictures to find the coolest photos on there. Why? Because I have a lot of free time and prefer to waste it on space shit, that’s why.

So do yourself a favor: set your responsibilities aside, grab a pre-roll of Animal Cookies, and spend hours staring at the pictures below.

NuSTAR Stares at the Sun(NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC/JAXA)

I’m way too high to read NASA’s entire description of this picture, but I’m pretty sure it’s an X-ray of the sun’s highest and lowest energy spots, taken by NuSTAR. Or it’s the next flavor of edible cookie to be released by Goodship. I’ll keep a $5 bill in my back pocket just in case.

Editor’s note: It could be an edible, but it’s definitely a “mosaic made from combining smaller images…[of] flaring, active regions of [the] sun.”

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Hubble Captures View of Mystic Mountain(NASA/ESA/STScI)

Here’s Mystic Mountain, a region of the Carina Nebula that looks so beautiful my eyes are watering. I don’t even know what to say about it, other than it looks like something they’d paint on the walls of a dispensary.

Editor’s note: For context, NASA describes this as “the chaotic activity atop a three-light-year-tall pillar of gas and dust that is being eaten away by the brilliant light from nearby bright stars in a tempestuous stellar nursery called the Carina Nebula.”

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Behemoth Black Hole Found in an Unlikely Place(NASA, ESA, and D. Coe, J. Anderson, and R. van der Marel/STScI)

This is a computer-simulated photo of a black hole at the center of a galaxy. There is no light inside of a black hole and apparently its gravitational pulls distort space around it, causing the energy and light of stars to make the space around it look like this.

It’s also a photo of my mood when I step out for the night, then quickly realize I just want to be at home. All this light and social energy around me, but I’m still just a little ball of darkness that can’t wait to sneakily call a Lyft and bounce.

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Spark Up and Check Out These 15 Mind-Blowing Space Images From NASA's Photo Library(NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC)

Here’s a picture of a blazar. What’s a blazar? Honestly, I have no clue. My Google searches got way too scientific and wordy with the answers, so I’ll just say it’s when a black hole pulls up on a galaxy like “Yo, hand over that energy, playboy,” and then the galaxy cooperates. In layman’s terms, it’s pretty much what Enchantress did to the city towards the end of Suicide Squad.

Editor’s note: In addition to being absurdly amusing, Dante’s description is basically accurate: a blasar is a black-hole-powered galaxy.

TS-65 Earth observation of Hurricane Emilia in Eastern Pacific Ocean

Remember Hurricane Emilia in 1994? Me neither. I was 4 and my only concern was if we were getting McDonalds for breakfast or not. But this is what a hurricane looks like from space. Wild, right? It feels like we’re watching the chamber of a bong fill with smoke. Can someone pull Earth’s stem and clear the smoke, please?

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Most Detailed Image of the Crab Nebula(NASA/ESA/JPL/Arizona State Univ.)

This is a picture of the Crab Nebula, but it really looks like a strain of cannabis called Moon Rocks. I can look at this picture and tell that it’ll get me way too high for comfort.

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Crab Nebula, as Seen by Herschel and Hubble(ESA/Herschel/PACS/MESS Key Programme)

This is the same Crab Nebula, which apparently also comes as an indica.

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Hubble Captures Vivid Auroras in Jupiter’s Atmosphere(NASA, ESA, and J. Nichols – University of Leicester)

Here’s Jupiter and the auroras in its atmosphere. What does that mean? Much like everything else on this list, I have absolutely no clue, but this picture is cool as hell. Also, if you stare at the middle of Jupiter for long enough, it starts to look like the Sistine Chapel. And if you stare at the auroras, it starts to remind you that it’s time to load another bowl.

Editor’s note: As NASA describes it, auroras “are created when high-energy particles enter a planet’s atmosphere near its magnetic poles and collide with atoms of gas.”

Hubble Sees a Horsehead of a Different Color(NASA/ESA/STScI)

This is a picture of the Horsehead Nebula. I guess it’s named after its appearance/shape, but all I see is a Lickitung on its back.

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Comets Kick up Dust in Helix Nebula(NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ.of Ariz.)

Lastly, check out the Helix Nebula. Not sure what that is, but it looks like an extremely judgmental eye that’s definitely staring into my soul and can see my browser history. Before it asks, I was hacked and also plead the fifth.

Meet the Cutest #DogsofCannabis on the Internet

You’ve heard of winery dogs—but did you know about #dogsofcannabis? First used by one bobby_bongs a couple of years ago, the tag has garnered less than 100 posts to date on Instagram—but the ones it has accumulated feature the cutest pups ever.

Honestly, we can’t quite tell how all these dogs connect to cannabis: some seem to be CBD pup patients, others live at cannabis farms, a few may simply be owned by cannabis consumers, and some seem to have no connection to cannabis whatsoever. Either way, we’re loving this niche hashtag. Check out some of the adorable pups we tracked down on Instagram living the canna-life.

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#dogsofcannabis

A post shared by Andi (@effysax) on Oct 6, 2016 at 10:36am PDT

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Editor’s note: While CBD can benefit dogs and cats with certain medical conditions, never allow your pet to consume your cannabis—THC can make them extremely sick. Here’s what to do if it happens on accident.

In Photos: The Evolution of a Tony Greenhand Joint

Tony Greenhand is the world’s greatest joint roller. We visited him on three consecutive occasions at his home in Albany, OR to capture his process as he rolled a smokable sculpture of Mike Tyson eating an avocado. The project, which was completed over multiple months, was commissioned by Leafly after Greenhand expressed a wish to roll it in an interview.

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Check out the gallery to see how Greenhand turns 2.5 ounces of cannabis into an irreverent, smokable work of art.

Images: David Alvarado for Leafly.

After the Shooting: Christianians Call for Legalization, Stand Up to Gang Violence

Christianians Speak Out Against Cannabis Prohibition

While in the area, I met with Christiania resident Maxime A.*, who was born and raised in the community. Maxime, 26, volunteers in Christiania, cares for a teenage boy with epilepsy, works in Christiania and elsewhere in Copenhagen, and is part of a committee that meets weekly to discuss how to rid Christiania of the gang violence that ultimately led to the shooting back in August. Although Maxime only uses cannabis occasionally, it is an integral part of his life.

“Christiania wants a hash market. The thing that we wanted after the tearing down was it to be transparent…just regular, kind people selling and buying,” he says. “[At community meetings] we’ve been talking about just building one big place where they can all be… We considered having people come in and work for free and sell hash at a stand to make a statement. We’ll even risk going to jail, even regular people who don’t smoke. It’s been very tiring,” he adds.

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“A few weeks after the incident with the police, there was so much momentum for talking…about legalizing cannabis, until a month ago, and then the flame went out.”

Maxime says the community’s choice to shut down their own stalls was a direct protest against the gang violence tied to the cannabis black market. “A few weeks after the incident with the police, there was so much momentum for talking…about legalizing cannabis, until a month ago, and then the flame went out,” he says.

Danish politicians have repeatedly brushed aside efforts to legalize cannabis over the years; Copenhagen, for instance, has requested (and been denied) a trial program for cannabis legalization three times. Shootings are just one negative effect of putting legalization off indefinitely; others have taken a toll over longer periods of time. “I would say from Christiania many kids from my generation at least grew up with this negative idea of the police, they were always looking in our windows, my sister and I have been stopped many times, checking our bags. It was very unpleasant,” Maxime recounts. “It didn’t really seem like they were there to help us. I always kind of felt like a criminal living in Christiania.” He is quick to note that this isn’t the fault of individual police officers; rather, it’s a larger matter that could be addressed by legalization.

These California Politicians are Emerging as Strong Prop. 64 Supporters

For decades, cannabis was an issue that most elected officials assiduously avoided. How the tide has shifted. In this election’s most closely watched (and arguably, most influential) cannabis campaign, in California, elected officials are coming out in support of legal, regulated cannabis, available to anyone 21 and over. These officials have decided to drop the drug-war rhetoric and instead embrace legalization—for diverse reasons. Bao Nyuyen, the mayor of Garden Grove, sees it primarily as a criminal justice reform issue. Scott Matas, mayor of Desert Hot Springs, sees legalization as an economic windfall. Others side with Prop. 64 for reasons of personal freedom, public safety, and social justice.

The individuals below are just six of dozens of officials who’ve come out in support of the measure. All told, 38 elected officials and 18 public safety officials—ranging from small-town mayors to US congressional representatives to the state’s lieutenant governor—have endorsed Prop. 64.

The legalization movement is a big tent now. People from all walks of life—cannabis consumers or not—have come to see its numerous benefits. It’s encouraging that some elected officials have chosen to lead by example. But legalization is only the beginning. If Prop. 64 passes, the cannabis community will be counting on these leaders to help develop and support thoughtful, responsible policies to help make legalization’s promised benefits become reality.

Bao Nguyen, Garden Grove Mayor

Garden Grove Mayor Bao Nguyen poses for a portrait in Garden Grove City Hall in Garden Grove, Calif. (Justin L. Stewart for Leafly)

“The most important thing that Proposition 64 does is decriminalizing marijuana use. That’s enough reason for me to support it. We’ve already seen the impacts of current policies on our families, communities, on immigrant communities. It’s not right. As mayor of the City of Garden Grove, I’ve seen how the lack of regulations and current ban on cannabis and access to medical cannabis has affected my city. I think that regulations and decriminalizing, allowing adults to use cannabis recreationally, will not only have a benefit to the economy in terms of being able to generate revenue, but also create a safer community. … It’s not only safe access for adults but it ensures that local cities have the tools to make sure that it doesn’t interfere with the overall local economy.

“But the primary reason I’m supporting it is because it decriminalizes adult use. Our jails are already overcrowded. Our justice system is not necessarily just. I hope that our voters vote on it and they vote for it so that we can decriminalize adult use.”

Scott Matas, Desert Hot Springs Mayor

Desert Hot Springs Mayor Scott Matas poses for a portrait at city hall in Desert Hot Springs, CA. (Justin L. Stewart for Leafly)Desert Hot Springs Mayor Scott Matas poses for a portrait at City Hall in Desert Hot Springs, Calif. (Justin L. Stewart for Leafly)

“Four or five years ago, we were in a fiscal crisis—we were looking at bankruptcy and the city looked at many options and this was one of the options. When you have a $15 million budget each year and you’re looking at over $20 million in revenue—if everything is built out, you’re looking at triple, quadrupling your budget. The things you can do with that is putting more officers on the street, fixing your parks, your roads, and doing the right things for your community and the quality of life issues that are much needed.”

Barb Stanton, Apple Grove Mayor

Apple Grove Mayor Barb Stanton poses for a portrait in the Apple Valley Town Hall in Apple Valley, Calif. (Justin L. Stewart for Leafly)

“I’m in favor of legalization of cannabis and Prop. 64 because I believe we’ve been systematically denied our rights and also the realities of what this natural plant can do for humanity.

“I’ve always been borderline, but the CBD component—the cannabinoids—really caused me to take a second look. Research clearly shows that CBD will alleviate the most horrific conditions in the arena of epilepsy. I saw examples of people who have had a diaphragm that sort of fibrillates constantly. I viewed a film that showing that within 30-seconds [of application], muscle contractions stopped. So it was the research and people reaching out to me and saying ‘Please help us. The state’s licensed us, but you won’t.’”

Tom Campbell, Retired Congressman

Professor Tom Campbell poses for portraits on the Chapman University campus Monday, November 1, <strong>2016</strong> in Orange, CA. (Justin L. Stewart for Leafly)Tom Campbell, now a professor, poses for portraits on the Chapman University campus Monday, Nov. 1, 2016 in Orange, Calif. (Justin L. Stewart for Leafly)

“Government should intrude on individual liberty only when necessary. I believe we have far too intrusive government in our country today. If an adult wishes to smoke marijuana, abide by all the laws that prevent such a person from driving or sharing it with a minor, they should be able to do so. I want to add that I’ve never smoked marijuana, do not intend to, do not advise that anybody smoke marijuana—but I also see reasonable limits to government…

“The issue has been in public policy for a long time, and I was open to argument. One of the biggest influences to me was the RAND Corporation study. … They recognized that we are not keeping young people from drugs, we are wasting a lot of money, and we are putting a lot of people in the criminal justice system who then stay there the rest of their life. It’s a racial component too. It’s particularly prevalent that individuals in the African-American community are arrested for drugs more than comparable situated persons of Asian or Caucasian ancestry, and that bothers me too.

“But my primary reason is liberty. Freedom. Individuals should be free. Government should intrude only when necessary.”

Denis O’Leary, Oxnard School District Trustee

Oxnard School District Trustee and school teacher Denis O’Leary poses for a portrait in Collection Park in Oxnard, CA. (Justin L. Stewart, Leafly) Oxnard School District Trustee and school teacher Denis O’Leary poses for a portrait in Collection Park in Oxnard, Calif. (Justin L. Stewart for Leafly)

“I don’t drink. I’ve never smoked tobacco or anything else in my life. … The reason I believe it should be legalized is it is in our streets. If any 14 year old wants to get ahold of some marijuana, they’re going to get ahold of it. I’d rather the industry be regulated, legal. I also think this would be a major defeat for the Mexican mafia or any other types that abuse society. I’m not going to be advocating that people go out and buy marijuana, just like I don’t advocate people go out to buy alcohol or cigarettes, but legally, they can. I’m hoping that making this legal will bring the industry out of the shadows, bring responsibility to the industry, and with regulation, actually be helpful to a demand that’s already there. People already want this, they already use it. Prohibition against marijuana hasn’t ever worked. It hasn’t worked against alcohol and I think that it’s time that we realize that prohibition of marijuana has only increased the size of our jails for non-violent criminals—what they call criminals…

“It’s out there. Any city in this country has it, and any adult, and even a teenager or kid that wants it, can get it. Now Prop. 64 will not allow that 14 year old to get the marijuana just as liquor stores will not allow the 14 year old to get alcohol.

“I am for responsibility, but I think the responsibility now is that we need to recognize the industry and legitimize it and not throw people in jail because they have a joint.”

Ty Alper, Berkeley School Board Vice President

Ty Alper, Berkeley School Board Vice President and an associate dean at the Boalt Hall Berkeley School of <strong><a href=Law, poses for a photograph outside the school in Berkeley, Calif. " width="840" height="525" />Ty Alper, Berkeley School Board Vice President and an associate dean at the Boalt Hall Berkeley School of Law, poses for a photograph outside the school in Berkeley, Calif. (D. Ross Cameron for Leafly)

“The failed war on drugs is really a successful war on black and brown people. Marijuana legalization is a civil rights issue, and Prop. 64 represents an important step towards a criminal justice system that is truly just.”

In Photos: California Wildfire Endangers Cannabis Crops

A drought-fueled inferno that began in California this week intensified on Tuesday, destroying homes, scorching dry brush and timber, and putting hundreds of cannabis plants in jeopardy.

The blaze, which started Monday about 30 miles south of San Jose, had reduced at least two houses to rubble and threatened more than 300 buildings by Tuesday afternoon. No injuries had been reported at the time, but property damage was widespread.

Anthony Lopez harvests <strong><a href=marijuana plants as the Loma fire burns around his home near Morgan Hill, Calif., on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)" width="840" height="526" />Anthony Lopez harvests marijuana plants as the Loma fire burns around his home near Morgan Hill, Calif., on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
Anthony Lopez harvests <strong><a href=marijuana plants as the Loma fire burns around his home near Morgan Hill, Calif., on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)" width="840" height="526" />Anthony Lopez harvests marijuana plants as the Loma fire burns around his home near Morgan Hill, Calif., on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
Anthony Lopez harvests marijuana plants as the Loma fire burns around his home near Morgan Hill, Calif., on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)Anthony Lopez harvests marijuana plants as the Loma fire burns around his home near Morgan Hill, Calif., on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Firefighters have struggled to control the wildfire in the face of tinder-dry humidity and temperatures in the upper 90s. Difficult terrain and other obstacles have also slowed responders’ efforts to extinguish the flames, the Associated Press reports:

One remote area where the fire burned is 30 minutes up a winding dirt road. Another is dotted with large-scale marijuana growing operations. A main route along the ridgetop is not accessible, even to firefighters, because of downed utility lines.

Resident Anthony Lopez, who grows cannabis plants, returned to his home Tuesday despite still being under evacuation orders. The AP reports he was “overjoyed” to find his dozens of cannabis plants still standing—and his 1972 Buick Skylark uncharred—but other growers haven’t been so lucky.

Last month another Northern California fire caused more than $10 million in damages—including cannabis plants that belonged to Lower Lake resident James McCauley. The plants were effectively destroyed after being coated by bright pink fire retardant, and newspapers around the world showed him weeping over the lost crop.

Marijuana plants are covered in fire retardant near the remains of a burned out house in Lower Lake, Calif., Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson)Marijuana plants are covered in fire retardant near the remains of a burned out house in Lower Lake, Calif., Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson)
James McCauley weeps while looking over the burned out remains of his prized marijuana plant and what's left of his residence in the town of Lower Lake, Calif. on August 15, 2016. McCauley traversed a creek by boat for a half mile to see the property. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson)James McCauley weeps while looking over the burned out remains of his prized marijuana plant and what’s left of his residence in the town of Lower Lake, Calif. on August 15, 2016. McCauley traversed a creek by boat for a half mile to see the property. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson)
A firefighter walks through marijuana plants as mop-up continued during the Clayton fire after structures were destroyed in Lower Lake, Calif., Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (Hector Amezcua/The Sacramento Bee via AP)A firefighter walks through marijuana plants as mop-up continued during the Clayton fire after structures were destroyed in Lower Lake, Calif., Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (Hector Amezcua/The Sacramento Bee via AP)
Marijuana plants are covered in fire retardant near the remains of a burned out house in Lower Lake, Calif., Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson)Marijuana plants are covered in fire retardant near the remains of a burned out house in Lower Lake, Calif., Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson)

“This fire is a good reminder that even though we are approaching October, this time of year is historically when we experience the largest and most damaging wildfires,” Cal Fire spokesman Daniel Berlant told the AP.

Farmers of cannabis and other agricultural products in California have long worried over water supplies in the state, and concerns have deepened as the weather grows hotter and dryer. A provision of Prop. 64, a measure on November’s ballot that would legalize cannabis for adult use in California, goes so far as to prohibit additional cultivation in regional watersheds that can’t support it. But as this summer’s wildfires show, a warming climate can mean more than water woes for California growers.

Lead Photo: AP/Noah Berger